onebay1:

SMELL LIKE A MAN
SPORT SCENT SO EVEN WHEN YOUR CLOTHES ARE CLEANED AFTER SPORTS YOU STILL SMELL LIKE SPORTS
SMELLING LIKE SPORTS MEANS YOU ARE A MAN BECAUSE ALL MEN PLAY SPORTS AND IF YOU DO NOT ALWAYS HAVE SPORTS SMELL YOU NEED TO MAN UP!
SMELL LIKE YOU CAN MAN AND ALSO LIKE YOU CAN SPORTS

onebay1:

SMELL LIKE A MAN

SPORT SCENT SO EVEN WHEN YOUR CLOTHES ARE CLEANED AFTER SPORTS YOU STILL SMELL LIKE SPORTS

SMELLING LIKE SPORTS MEANS YOU ARE A MAN BECAUSE ALL MEN PLAY SPORTS AND IF YOU DO NOT ALWAYS HAVE SPORTS SMELL YOU NEED TO MAN UP!

SMELL LIKE YOU CAN MAN AND ALSO LIKE YOU CAN SPORTS

Reblogged from the-rogue-0f-light

sashayed:

silvermoon424:

poppypicklesticks:

billybatsonandjameshowlettsbro:

cosmicallycosmopolitan:

billybatsonandjameshowlettsbro:

james-winston:

The Titanoboa, is a 48ft long snake dating from around 60-58million years ago. It had a rib cage 2ft wide, allowing it to eat whole crocodiles, and surrounding the ribcage were muscles so powerful that it could crush a rhinoTitanoboa was so big it couldn’t even spend long amounts of time on land, because the force of gravity acting on it would cause it to suffocate under its own weight.

I’m so glad they aren’t around

omg me too. I’m scared enough of 26 ft long anacondas. I’m so happy Megalodons, those giant sharks, aren’t alive either

Praise natural selection

I remember watching Walking with Beasts or something similar, or some British tv show about evolution

The subject was something like a 12 foot long water scorpion

I was so startled by its sudden appearance and narration that I yelped: “12 fucking feet?!?!  I’m fucking glad it’s extinct!” 

Dude, prehistory was home to some fucking TERRIFYING creatures. For some reason, everything back then was enormous and scary. Extinction doesn’t always have to be a bad thing!

And Poppy, what you saw was an arthropod known as Pterygotus (it was actually featured in Walking With Monsters). Not only was it as big (or maybe even bigger) than your average human, it had a stinger the size of a lightbulb. REALLY glad that bugger isn’t around anymore.

Also, Megalodon deserves to be mention again, because just hearing its name makes me want to never be submerged in water ever again.

GOD, I HATE THIS POST. HOW DO WE EVEN KNOW THAT SHIT ISN’T STILL AROUND? LURKING? EVOLVING? WE DON’T. WE DON’T KNOW SHIT ABOUT SHIT DOWN THERE. THE OCEAN IS A PRIMEVAL HELLSCAPE NIGHTMARE AND WE ALL JUST DIP OUR STUPID FRAGILE UNPROTECTED FETUS BODIES AROUND THE EDGES OF IT LIKE THAT’S NORMAL. FUCK THE OCEAN.

Reblogged from thegrandhighbllood

oupacademic:

Fractals

Are fractals simple or complicated objects? Or perhaps both?  The beauty and attraction of many fractals stems from their complex and intricate form, with ever more detail becoming apparent under increasing magnification. Yet many fractals depend on a very simple rule, applied over and over again, a process called iteration.

The Mandelbrot set is perhaps the best known example. It is completely determined by the very simple formula  z2 + c, where z and c code points in the plane or on a computer screen in terms of ‘complex numbers’.  If, starting at 0 and repeatedly applying the formula to move from one point to the next, the sequence of points stay ‘close to home’, then c belongs to the Mandelbrot set and is coloured black in the pictures. If, on the other hand, the itinerary rapidly shoots off or ‘escapes’ into the distance, then c lies outside the Mandelbrot set and is coloured according to the rate of escape.

This simple rule is very easily programmed on a computer. Yet the Mandelbrot set is an extraordinarily complex object. It has a prominent cardioid, or heart shape, surrounded by near circular buds, which in turn have smaller buds attached to them. On closer inspection, stars, spirals and sea horses become apparent. Joined to these are many fine hairs on which lie miniature copies of the Mandelbrot set itself, and increased magnification reveals an endless gallery of ever more exotic features.

For its appearance alone, the Mandelbrot set would merely be a fascinating curiosity. But in recent years its remarkable mathematical properties have become enormously significant. Naturally associated with each point c of the Mandelbrot set is another fractal, called a Julia set. If c is in the main cardioid, then the Julia set is a closed loop, if c is in the largest bud, then it is formed by infinitely many loops, meeting systematically in pairs, and so on.  Moreover, the Mandelbrot set is ‘universal’ in that it codes the behaviour of iteration by many formulae other than just z2 + c.

Kenneth Falconer is a mathematician who specializes in Fractal Geometry and related topics. He is author of Fractals: A Very Short Introduction.

Images courtesy of Kenneth Falconer.

Reblogged from infinity-imagined